Grundy Reporter

Grundy Reporter

Friday, February 21, 2020

City of Highland Park City Council met December 16

By Michael Abella | Jan 22, 2020

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City of Highland Park City Council met Dec. 18.

Here is the minutes provided by the council:

Mayor Michaelis called the Regular Session to order at 7:00pm. Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind were present. Others in attendance were City Attorney McGinley, Directors Conrad, Cook, Gillespie, Imming, Korte, Rosen, and Slover; Coordinator Hubbard, Building & Zoning Administrator Speraneo, Deputy City Clerk Hediger, City Clerk Bellm, 39 citizens, and two members of the news media.

MINUTES

Councilman Frey made a motion to approve the minutes of the December 2, 2019 Regular Session as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Sloan. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

PUBLIC FORUM

Citizens’ Requests and Comments:

Highland Jaycees Larry Palooza Square Use Request – Rebecca Klug, 2020 President-Elect,

requested permission for the Jaycees to hold an event on the Square on Saturday, April 25, 2020, 2:00pm – 11:00pm, benefiting the Larry Jones Scholarship Fund. For the event, they are requesting use of the Square Pavilion, public restroom access and closure of Main Street, from Washington to Laurel Street. Portable restroom facilities will also be onsite. Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve the Highland Jaycees’ request for use of the Square and facilities on Saturday, April 25, 2020 as requested; seconded by Councilman Frey. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

A person came forward and stated they would like to address the referendum vote on the agenda for the dispensary. I saw in the news that the issue was causing a lot of discussion. It is a psychological phenomenon. People who are in favor of things are not going to voice their opinions. It is negativity bias. Since 2009, been a plurality of support for legalization of marijuana. Heard comments that Highland does not need to be liberal. There are concerns that this will bring riff raff. When studies show there is no increase in nonviolent or violent crimes in communities where these exist. In The Journal of Urban Economics, it showed communities with dispensaries show a growth in their economic base.

There is actually a reallocation of resources, because law enforcement is not having to pursue marijuana crimes, and they could put resources to other agenda items. This law is similar to open container laws. You are not going to have people smoking it openly in the streets. The most important thing is the money issue. Some communities, reportedly, have received six times the tax revenues from marijuana and associated sales versus other taxing sources. He noted Highland recently had a 1/2% sales tax increase for the schools; so obviously, we can use the tax revenue. It is going to be legal in this state, regardless. Why not have the tax revenue come from within rather sending it to other communities? He added I am a father of two young children who does not partake in the use of it.

Brian Farmer stated I have a different perspective. I am a one-hundred percent disabled veteran. I have been able to stay off pills for the past six months due to edible marijuana. Once this is legal, the hope is that this promotes more research to see who else this can be benefit. Alcohol kills more people than any other drug, by far. It is going to be legal. Mr. Farmer asked Chief Conrad, have you seen a heroin dealer in this town. Chief Conrad replied, dealer no. Users, yes. Chief Conrad asked have you seen marijuana use here. Chief Conrad replied yes. Mr. Farmer pointed out it is here. Even though we do not want it. You cannot put a cocoon over our kids’ heads. I am very passionate about this. The taxes were implemented by the state. The 3% tax rate was set by the state. There is not a government that does not take all the money that they can get. And we should take it.

Emily Livingston stated I am an attorney. This issue was voted on by everyone on this committee and approved by all but one. That member has then begun using social media to spread fear. Painted users at criminals and as a risk to people in Highland. There are people suffering from medical conditions and yes, potential consumers, in this community. They are your constituents. Reality: Marijuana has shown to decrease in opioid deaths. Fact: Communities have not seen an increase in cannabis use in their youth. Reality: There has been an uptick in veteran suicides due to the stigma of cannabis use. These arguments promote judgment of their neighbors. Any councilmember that votes on this referendum must ask themselves, how would you feel if your city council person prohibits you from filling prescription in the city you live in. The ordinance merely creates a pathway for a person to decide to if Highland is a viable option. The marketplace will and should take care of the fact that a dispensary is not a good fit for the community. The reality though is that the vote for this is a delay to constituents. A delay against free market and personal rights. Consider your roles. Any council member that votes for this and against a dispensary should also deny the sale of alcohol for community groups at events and the sale of tobacco. Vote based on principles, vote for freedom. Vote against this proposed referendum.

Phyllis Sway expressed I am afraid of the impact on the community. I am not here to judge people’s morals. It is going to be legal in this state, regardless. Drugs and crimes go hand in hand. It may even bring in more cartels. It may lead to other addictions. There is a dispensary twenty miles away. It is legal and available. Glen Carbon voted no, because the police chief felt it was a bad choice for the community. Only cash-only transactions are allowed for these dispensaries, which leaves them more vulnerable to theft and crime. This is illegal at the federal law. You cannot hold a FOID card. Federal employees will not be allowed to use. It just does not make sense to rush into this. I do not feel this is right for the people of this town, without allowing them to get to vote on it. I understand people have needs and medical needs. That is a certain percentage. My husband and I have suffered immensely from drug addiction in our family.

Krystal Connor stated, I created and administer a Highland Community Facebook group. This has been a hot topic over the past few weeks. There is over 2800 members. Most speak out in support of it. Allowing a dispensary is not about allowing potheads. There are children that are using THC to stop seizures. There are others that use it for other medical needs. As a disabled veteran, I would hope that if I should need to use it in the future, it is available. The licensing in Illinois is expensive and hard to get. Just because you are using recreationally does not mean they are nonproductive members of society. A poll was done on the group site. 205 have voted in favor of it. The ratio is four to one in favor.

Jason Clark stated it is not hard to get a medical marijuana use license. They can do it here or anywhere. Be an upstanding community and stand by your vote.

Jennifer Scott stated I am new to Highland. Highland has a lot of small town qualities. In a good way. I moved here from Florida. I have live in Washington and other states where marijuana is legal. I am pro marijuana and dispensaries. I am a recovering alcoholic that uses marijuana. For me, I use it daily. I have PTSD and MS. I have seen both the pros and cons of it. I have lost friends to opioids, and I feel that marijuana is a good way for many to get off that opioids. I took care of my parents until they passed. There is a strong scent to marijuana. My father would speak about the reefer madness. However, as I told my father, ‘Do I look crazy to you? No. Because I am not. But it helps me.’

Beau Ohren stated I am Alhambra resident and a member of the Metro East Libertarians. I do not really do it. I did it in my past. I have lost sixteen friends to opioids. Shana Anderson, David Johnson, and others. No one bats an eye to opioids and alcohol. I get you would rather be known as an alcohol town. Cannabis has been shown to decrease opioid cravings and addiction issues. There is no evidence to support that cannabis kills people. Fact is, data shows, counties with marijuana sales have less opioid and heroin deaths. At Thanksgiving, my grandma asked my mom about using marijuana. This is an 85- year old lady. If I could give her marijuana over all the bottles of pills she uses every day, I am thinking that is pretty great. I am talking about saving lives here someday. This is the way to fight the opioid crisis. You need to get off your high horse people. People are going to do it in Illinois regardless. The laws have changed. Those that insist on some morale high grounds are going to realize that they missed out. New Baden will get the business.

Mark McGranahan thanked the council for listen to us over the past month. I do not want to bore everyone. If you recall, from the statistics presented, only one category in crime went down from 2012 to 2018. Otherwise, across the board, crime was up 5% in same time frame as the nation’s overall numbers decreased. He read from an article citing that in 2015, schools breathed collective sighs, as the number one issue in schools was marijuana. The director of school resource center reported they had not seen the tremendous change in taxes, but continued to deal with the issues of marijuana use at schools. I do not know that anyone in the room is against medical marijuana use. Mr. McGranahan asked Chief Conrad why the Illinois Chief of Police Association fought against legalization in Illinois. Chief Conrad responded mainly because it is still illegal at the federal level. Mr. McGranahan ask that the council allow this to go forward and allow the people to voice their opinions in a vote. Please let that happen. I spoke with a police officer in this town, recently; they expressed concern over what this will do to their job.

Ken Keeven asked Chief Conrad where these dispensaries are not allowed. Chief Conrad stated they are limited to outside of 1,000 feet from any schools, parks, and churches. Mr. Keeven noted from the law itself, by the required setbacks, this says that it is not good for the community.

Nick Taylor stated I am here to voice support for the dispensary. Marijuana has never killed anyone. People have never died from marijuana overdose. We can all see the medical benefits. The federal law will change in time. You can see that by the glimpse of growth. It is about personal freedom, for me. There are plenty of other things for us to worry about. I am not a user. I am a father to two young children.

Kevin Hoffmann pointed out it is obvious we have a lot of educated people in Highland. I recommend that you allow people in the town to make the decision.

Mr. Sway stated I do not want to deprive anyone that has a need for medical marijuana. I know many that feel they have seen the benefit from using it for medical needs. If it is the issue about money, then we are way out of line. Naperville, Glen Carbon, and others have voted against it. Since legalizing in Colorado, homeless has increased. Many users proceed to more addictive drugs, which has led to that homeless population. Keep in mind the increased potency of today’s marijuana, which makes it more addictive. If you smoke it, you get immediate effects. However, edibles you will not get that effect until sometime later, which leads to overdoses. I saw a television program, featuring a respectable couple living in a tent with their child, because of their addiction to marijuana. I smoked pot and drank alcohol before I was twenty-one. To think it is not going to affect our kids is wrong. We have lost our families to drugs. Mr. Sway agreed you will not die due to a marijuana overdose; however, when you are at a party with marijuana and you are using, and other drugs show up, you are more inclined to use. Madison County Board Member Phil Chapman voted against allowing dispensaries in unincorporated areas of Madison County. He stated that it leads to illegal use and other drugs. Is marijuana the answer to keeping people off opioids? I do not know. However, 1/1/2020 people will be able to use it in this state. I think Highland can attract other businesses that are more attractive than this. I do not think we should be the guinea pig on this issue.

Carol Hendrichs stated I spoke at the last meeting. Bottom line is, this is a very passionate issue for a lot of people. In saying that, those for and against it, can always find statistics to support their issues. I would not want the council to have the last say on this matter. I think you would want to have the overall opinion put to the people. This is too big of an issue.

Jason Clark stated it is easier to say wait and see. I am asking them to put off a referendum vote.

Chris Connor pointed out the council already passed to allow a dispensary. We either spend the money on a referendum or just see if there is any interest by anyone to open one in this community. If it goes to a referendum, it is going to pass. The median age is young enough.

Jonell Safford stated I am seventy-five years old. Most of my adult life I have wished marijuana was legal. I taught on both sides of the river and have taken many joints away from kids. If I was alive in the time of prohibition, I would probably be against it. Most residents in this town smoke and or drink in front of their kids while telling their kids it is bad for them. How would things change if this was legal? Probably for the better.

Requests of Council:

Councilwoman Bellm noted she made a requested, from the citizens that lived on Tamarack for

speed control. However, what they are telling me, now, is that the speed on Route 160, from north of the school to that area, is getting excessive. Maybe it would be helpful to put one of those speed recognition signs up out there. Director Conrad stated we could put it up out there shortly. It is gathering data somewhere else right now.

Mayor Michaelis stated he attended the Heartland Community Chorus Concert, yesterday. The issue with the dispensary came up. The biggest concern expressed was not getting the information out there about issues coming in front of the council. Not everyone uses Facebook. Maybe we could post on a marque sign or I am looking suggestions on a way to get the issues or topics out there. Councilwoman Sloan pointed out that we put it on the city’s website already, and Mr. Naper puts it into The Pioneer. If people cannot see those, then I am not sure how much more we can do. Mayor Michaelis stated I am just looking for suggestions.

Jason Clark came forward and stated it is not you. It is the public’s responsibility to stay informed. You should also listen to social media and others. I think it would be a failure of our community to put it into another newspaper. Councilman John Hipskind stated I use Facebook. He noted the City of Highland is transitioning to a new website. Possibly, we could put the agenda on the front page of the new website. Councilwoman Bellm asked are we talking about this issue or anything. As far as a sign, I am not sure anyone would stop to look. What about The Highlights, which go out as an attachment with the utility billings? I know that goes out quarterly, but possibly add these items to the billings. I agree we should not just rely on social media. Mayor Michaelis expressed I am not sure a decision needs to be made this evening. I am looking for thoughts and opinions as to is there a way that we can get information regarding important issues out there.

Staff Reports:

City Manager Latham congratulated Chief Conrad, the police department, and all the businesses

that participated with Christmas with A Cop. Chief Conrad stated a huge thanks to everyone that contributed. They were able to take all the kids for new shoes at Hibbetts. We had eight more kids than last year.

City Manager Latham reported we have been working on getting signalization at Hemlock and Route 143 for about ten years now. Between IDOT and CSX, we will have an ICC hearing in January, with the intent to get the project done this next summer.

NEW BUSINESS

Bill #19-171/ORDINANCE Placing One Referendum Question on the Ballot for the March 17, 2020 Election, Specifically: Should the City of Highland License and Permit a Cannabis Dispensary to Operate within the Corporate Boundaries of the City – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19-171/Ordinance #2988 placing one referendum question on the ballot for the March 17, 2020 Election, specifically: Should the City of Highland License and Permit a Cannabis Dispensary to Operate within the Corporate Boundaries of the City, as attached. Motion seconded by Councilman Frey.

Councilwoman Bellm expressed this is a tough one. I have thankfully heard from both sides. I thank everyone who has been at these meetings on this topic. I appreciate that you take the time to come out on a nasty night to voice your opinions on this. I have heard both sides on this, through in person meetings, letters, emails, and social media. Other than the time Walmart was coming to town and the construction of Silver Lake, I do not know that I have experienced so much discussion. Because of that, I feel we need to put this to a referendum vote. It is not my job to change your opinion. It is my job to listen to everyone and make a decision. To go to referendum, I feel like I am abandoning my role of what you elected me to do. However, because there is so much information out there on this, I do not know what is best for the community. What I posted is what I got from Chief Conrad, as issued from the State of Illinois. I ask that everyone go to the poles and vote. It is a non-binding referendum. I certainly am not going to commit to how I will vote; however, a popular vote weighs very heavily on my decisions.

Councilman Hipskind thanked everyone that is here to speak on this. I know that some of us have differing opinions. I know speaking on this is difficult. Councilwoman Sloan stated I have volunteered a lot of my time in many ways and places. I think this has been a healthy discussion. Councilman Frey echoed what everyone else has said. We are up here to serve the community and do what is best for everyone. It is a non-binding referendum. We all voted with our hearts to do what we felt was best for the community. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Councilwoman Bellm made a motion for ten- minutes recess; seconded by Councilman Frey. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried. Meeting recessed at 8:15pm.

Mayor Michaelis reconvened the meeting at 8:25pm. Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind were present. Others in attendance were City Attorney McGinley, Directors Conrad, Cook, Gillespie, Imming, Korte, Rosen, and Slover; Coordinator Hubbard, Building & Zoning Administrator Speraneo, Deputy City Clerk Hediger, City Clerk Bellm, 18 citizens, and two members of the news media.

Bill #19-172/RESOLUTION Prohibiting Accepting Applications, Awarding Licenses, or Amending the City Zoning Code, Pursuant to Chapter 4, Cannabis, Until After the Referendum Vote has been Taken on March 17, 2020 – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Bill #19-172/Resolution #19- 12-2676 prohibiting accepting applications, awarding licenses, or amending the City Zoning Code, pursuant to Chapter 4, Cannabis, until after the referendum vote has been taken on March 17, 2020 as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Bill #19-173/ORDINANCE Amending the 2019-2020 Budget – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19-173/Ordinance #2989 amending the 2019-2020 Budget as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Councilman Hipskind stated I have an issue with the levy, because it includes an amount for the senior center. Maybe City Attorney McGinley can separate it. City Attorney McGinley advised you need to levy to get the tax on for this next year. There is no referendum vote. If we pass this tax levy, we have to tax to do a lease or installment payment. Should the senior center go into a referendum vote, we will have taxed for it, but will refund. But, by law, we have to pass the ordinance amending the budget to levy for it. Councilman Hipskind stated I am going to abstain, since I do not support it. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Bellm voted aye, none nay. Councilman Frey and Councilman Hipskind abstained. Mayor Michaelis voted aye. Motion fails, as this requires four votes for approval. Deputy City Clerk Hediger and City Clerk Bellm expressed that the abstained votes, under Roberts Rules of Order, may actually be viewed as an indifferent, thus passing the ordinance. Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to recess to allow research for the answer. Motion seconded by Councilman Frey. All members voted aye, none nay. The meeting stood in recess.

Mayor Michaelis called the Regular Session to order at 8:40pm. Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind were present. Others in attendance were City Attorney McGinley, Directors Conrad, Cook, Gillespie, Korte, Rosen, and Slover; Coordinator Hubbard, Building & Zoning Administrator Speraneo, Deputy City Clerk Hediger, City Clerk Bellm, 15 citizens, and two members of the news media.

Deputy City Clerk Lana Hediger read from Robert’s Rules of Order: ‘If the vote required is a majority or two thirds of the members present, or a majority or two thirds of the entire membership, an abstention will have the same effect as a “no” vote.’ What occurred is two council people abstained. An abstention is not counted as a vote. This ordinance required a super-majority vote. Therefore, it fails.

Bill #19-174/ORDINANCE for Levy, Assessment and Collection of Taxes – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Bill #19-174/Ordinance #2989 for Levy, Assessment and Collection of Taxes as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Councilman Hipskind stated I am not in favor of the money to support the senior center. Councilman Hipskind asked City Attorney McGinley how to separate the levy for the senior center from the ordinance. Attorney McGinley advised to do a motion amending Bill #19- 174 to exclude the $30,000 installment contract for the senior center. Councilman Hipskind made a motion to amend Bill #19-174/Ordinance #2989 removing the $30,000 installment contract for the senior center. Councilman Frey seconded the motion. Councilwoman Bellm inquired so, if I abstain and someone else abstained, then this fails. It was a two-thirds vote to amend the budget, but this only needs a majority to approve this. However, right now we are voting on the amendment. Attorney McGinley advised yes. Roll Call Vote to amend the motion: Councilmembers Frey and Hipskind voted aye, Sloan and Bellm voted nay. Mayor Michaelis voted nay. Motion to amend failed.

Finance Director Kelly Korte explained the first item (Item C) is a requirement to allow us to levy for next year. I cannot levy for something that is not in the current year’s budget. We do have to have a levy to take to the county by 12/31/2019. We have to have some form of a levy to go to the council. Councilwoman Bellm inquired if the amendment was not approved, it is not in there. Director Korte explained it has to be removed, because it was voted down for this current budget year spending, so we cannot tax for it in the 2019 levy. City Attorney McGinley advised what is in your packet contained the whole entire tax levy, including $30,000 for the senior center. Now we are back to budget that did not carry. Councilman Hipskind expressed I feel we are voting on something we should not be voting on. City Attorney McGinley clarified the motion to amend the levy did not carry. To allow for the levy, the budget must be amended.

Deputy City Clerk Lana Hediger advised if you want to reconsider the vote on the amendment to Item D, the motion would need to be made by Councilwoman Sloan or Councilwoman Bellm. If the desire is to reconsider Item C, then that motion would need to be made by Councilman Frey or Councilman Hipskind.

Councilman Frey made a motion to reconsider Item C, Bill #19-173/ORDINANCE Amending the 2019-2020 Budget; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, and Bellm voted aye, none nay. Councilman Hipskind abstained. Motion carried. Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19-173/Ordinance #2989 amending 2019-2020 Budget as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm voted aye, none nay. Councilman Hipskind abstained. Mayor Michaelis voted aye. Motion carried.

Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Bill #19-174/ Ordinance #2990 for Levy, Assessment and Collection of Taxes as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm voted aye, none nay. Councilman Hipskind abstained. Motion carried.

Bill #19-175/RESOLUTION Approving Crown Media United States, LLC Member Renewal Letter Agreement and Commitment for the Hallmark/Hallmark Movies & Mysteries and Hallmark Drama Channel(s), for City of Highland d/b/a Highland Communication Services, Between Vivicast Media, LLC and Crown Media United States, LLC - Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19- 175/Resolution #19-12-2677 approving Crown Media United States, LLC Member Renewal Letter Agreement and Commitment for the Hallmark/Hallmark Movies & Mysteries and Hallmark Drama Channel(s), for City of Highland d/b/a Highland Communication Services, between Vivicast Media, LLC and Crown Media United States, LLC as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Bill #19-176/ORDINANCE Repealing and Replacing Chapter 90 – Zoning, Article IV – Supplemental Regulations, Section 90-208 – Fences and Walls, of the Code of Ordinances – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Bill #19-176/Ordinance #2991 repealing and replacing Chapter 90 – Zoning, Article IV – Supplemental Regulations, Section 90-208 – Fences and Walls, of the Code of Ordinances as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm.

Councilman Hipskind addressed Building & Zoning Administrator Breann Speraneo, stating, the memo was terrific and provided a lot of explanation. We have in here that if anyone wants to put something in the right of way, they will have to get permission from the City. There are a lot of times that I see this, but I do not feel there is enforcement of that. How are we going to enforce that? Administrator Speraneo explained this is regarding fences and walls. As far as signage, we do our best to try to enforce that, but occasionally we miss them. Typically, we will pull the sign and will give them a call to let them know we have the signage. When they pick it up, we let them know where it is allowed. Councilman Hipskind asked do you typically get those requests in writing. City Manager Latham responded normally I get those calls. Frequently, they call, but occasionally we get a written request. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Bill #19-177/ORDINANCE Amending the Code of Ordinances, Chapter 90 – Zoning, Article II – Administration and Enforcement, Division 3 – Applications, Permits and Fees, Sec. 90-67 – Fee Schedule) – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19-177/Ordinance #2992 amending the Code of Ordinances, Chapter 90 – Zoning, Article II – Administration and Enforcement, Division 3 – Applications, Permits and Fees, Sec. 90-67 – Fee Schedule) as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Councilwoman Bellm noted this is just lowering the application fee to $50.00. Administrator Speraneo reported it was a $250 application fee. This is for corner lot fence reviews. Councilman Hipskind asked why the fee was $650 to appeal to city council. Councilman Hipskind made a motion to change the fee schedule to appeal to the city council from $650.00 to $50.00. Motion to amend died for lack of a second. Councilwoman Sloan expressed I would be hesitant to vote on this without further information, because that is a substantial difference. Councilwoman Sloan made a motion to table until the next meeting; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried. Item tabled.

Bill #19-178/RESOLUTION Authorizing Execution of an Interlocal Contract for Cooperative Purchasing Between City and the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Bill #19-178/Resolution #19-12-2678 authorizing execution of an Interlocal Contract for cooperative purchasing between city and the Houston-Galveston Area Council (HGAC) as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Bill #19-179/RESOLUTION Approving and Authorizing the Assignment of an Agreement for Tax Increment Financing Between City and Klaus Service Center Inc., and KZ Properties Group, LLC – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Bill #19-179/Resolution #19-12-2679 approving and authorizing the assignment of an agreement for Tax Increment Financing between City and Klaus Service Center Inc., and KZ Properties Group, LLC as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Councilman Hipskind asked did we get the letter from IEPA that was required in the ordinance. Coordinator Mallord Hubbard replied yes, and it has been filed. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Approve Notice of Municipal Letting, Bid #PW-22-19, for Purchase of One 1-Ton Truck for Street and Alley – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Notice of Municipal Letting, Bid #PW-22- 19, for purchase of one 1-Ton Truck for Street and Alley as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Approve Notice of Municipal Letting, Bid #PR-23-19 for the Silver Lake Shoreline and Point Restoration Project – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Notice of Municipal Letting, Bid #PR-23-19 for the Silver Lake Shoreline and Point Restoration Project as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Approve Schedule of 2020 Meeting Dates for Council, Boards, and Commissions – Councilman Frey made a motion to approve Schedule of 2020 Meeting Dates for Council, Boards, and Commissions as attached; seconded by Councilwoman Bellm. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

REPORT

Approve Warrants #1150 & #1151 – Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to approve Warrants #1150 & #1151 as attached; seconded by Councilman Frey. Councilman Hipskind questioned the $12,663 amount to AAIM. City Manager Latham reported $9,000 AAIM wage study and the balance was for leadership group training that we did here for our directors. Councilman Hipskind noted $1100 for social media. Director Angela Imming explained that is for a contract that gets our advertisements into the Facebook advertisement based upon searches by users. Councilman Hipskind inquired how the analytics on that are. Director Imming reported we can go to the portal to see how they are trending. Based on recent check, 38,000 people have seen our images, which is $.002 per thousand. Roll Call Vote: Councilmembers Sloan, Frey, Bellm and Hipskind voted aye, none nay. Motion carried.

Councilwoman Bellm made a motion to adjourn; seconded by Councilwoman Sloan. All council members voted aye, none nay. Motion carried and meeting adjourned at 9:15pm.

https://www.highlandil.gov/sites/highlandil/files/minutes/12-16-2019.pdf

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